Mark Lin ( @kungfuhamstah ) Instagram Profile

kungfuhamstah

Mark Lin

  • 301 posts
  • 823 followers
  • 861 following

Mark Lin Profile Information

"You can't numb those hard feelings without numbing the other affects, our emotions. You cannot selectively numb. So when we numb those, we numb joy, we numb gratitude, we numb happiness. And then we are miserable, and we are looking for purpose and meaning, and then we feel vulnerable, so then we have a couple of beers and a banana nut muffin. And it becomes this dangerous cycle."
― @brenebrown .
As a child, I was constantly anxious. I feared disappointing my parents and not living up to others’ expectations. It led me to be afraid and hesitant all the time. I even had stress induced hives during high school. So, I became obsessed with suppressing this anxiety and fear. I eventually achieved that by numbing my emotions and it did work. I achieved success in my career and could deal with the stresses of my job in stride, but I wasn’t happy and I didn’t know why.
.
Then I found yoga and acroyoga. Yoga began dissolving my ego, but discovering acroyoga led to the more drastic changes in my mindset. Acroyoga encourages you to love the connections you forge with others and to learn to communicate with others and yourself with compassion and without judgement. Instead of just numbing my anxiety away, I learned to let go the sources of my anxiety — the expectations from others and myself. I began to love the journey instead of being obsessed with the destination. And to my surprise, the floodgates of joy and gratitude opened. I felt them more strongly than I ever had in the entirety of my life up to that point and I became determined to extend that to the other parts of my life.
.
I am so grateful for acroyoga which provides me with opportunities like the one in this photo where I get to base two badass flyers like @karemhm and @dashin4u.

"You can't numb those hard feelings without numbing the other affects, our emotions. You cannot selectively numb. So when we numb those, we numb joy, we numb gratitude, we numb happiness. And then we are miserable, and we are looking for purpose and meaning, and then we feel vulnerable, so then we have a couple of beers and a banana nut muffin. And it becomes this dangerous cycle."
@brenebrown .
As a child, I was constantly anxious. I feared disappointing my parents and not living up to others’ expectations. It led me to be afraid and hesitant all the time. I even had stress induced hives during high school. So, I became obsessed with suppressing this anxiety and fear. I eventually achieved that by numbing my emotions and it did work. I achieved success in my career and could deal with the stresses of my job in stride, but I wasn’t happy and I didn’t know why.
.
Then I found yoga and acroyoga. Yoga began dissolving my ego, but discovering acroyoga led to the more drastic changes in my mindset. Acroyoga encourages you to love the connections you forge with others and to learn to communicate with others and yourself with compassion and without judgement. Instead of just numbing my anxiety away, I learned to let go the sources of my anxiety — the expectations from others and myself. I began to love the journey instead of being obsessed with the destination. And to my surprise, the floodgates of joy and gratitude opened. I felt them more strongly than I ever had in the entirety of my life up to that point and I became determined to extend that to the other parts of my life.
.
I am so grateful for acroyoga which provides me with opportunities like the one in this photo where I get to base two badass flyers like @karemhm and @dashin4u .

93 17 18 March, 2019

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“Strong people don't put others down... They lift them up.” ― Michael P. Watson
.
@antigravitycanon, @acroyogaflame, and I have been holding the fort at @blackswanyogadallas for @maxandlizacro whenever they’re off traveling the world. It’s been awesome planning and teaching these past few classes with my fellow acrobrogi's. Our theme for the past two classes has been trio poses and it’s been pretty amazing to see all these acroyogi’s from beginners to veterans banding together, listening to our cues, and achieving badass things like these bird sandwich poses from our class on Saturday, March 16th. With these three person poses, safety becomes paramount and every single person stepped up their spotting game to ensure all of these poses were as safe as they were amazing. Kudos to my acrobrogi co-teachers and a special shout out goes to @jzkuhler for doing a great job of helping teach great spotting. And another special shout out to @belightacrobatics for introducing me to chariot races with the flyer standing on two bases. We totally did that for warmups in this class.
Stay tuned for the next time we sub and also follow @acrosiblins to find out when my sister, @zenbitch_actual, and I have our next pop up acroyoga workshops!

“Strong people don't put others down... They lift them up.” ― Michael P. Watson
.
@antigravitycanon , @acroyogaflame , and I have been holding the fort at @blackswanyogadallas for @maxandlizacro whenever they’re off traveling the world. It’s been awesome planning and teaching these past few classes with my fellow acrobrogi's. Our theme for the past two classes has been trio poses and it’s been pretty amazing to see all these acroyogi’s from beginners to veterans banding together, listening to our cues, and achieving badass things like these bird sandwich poses from our class on Saturday, March 16th. With these three person poses, safety becomes paramount and every single person stepped up their spotting game to ensure all of these poses were as safe as they were amazing. Kudos to my acrobrogi co-teachers and a special shout out goes to @jzkuhler for doing a great job of helping teach great spotting. And another special shout out to @belightacrobatics for introducing me to chariot races with the flyer standing on two bases. We totally did that for warmups in this class.
Stay tuned for the next time we sub and also follow @acrosiblins to find out when my sister, @zenbitch_actual , and I have our next pop up acroyoga workshops!

102 7 17 March, 2019
For me, acroyoga is this ridiculously amazing thing that changed my life for the better. That being said, it occurs to me that acroyoga may mean something different to me than it does to others. Acroyoga became something so mind altering that I thought everyone should have the opportunity to experience it. That's why I chose to become a part-time acroyoga teacher, but I realize that not everyone's acroyoga experience is like mine. For some, it's just a physical practice. And that's OK, because you'll still achieve amazing things and cultivate a strong body, but for me, it's the "yoga" part of "acroyoga" that gives it its greatest strength. And I would even go as far as to say that it even levels up your existing yoga practice when you add the "acro” part to it.
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The “yoga” part of acroyoga instills certain values in the practitioner when it's practiced earnestly. When the values are not part of the practice, you can potentially see things like: jealousy between bases or flyers, ego fueled coercion to keep trying skills that endanger those involved, muscling flyers into poses without full consent or awareness, blaming each other instead of listening and communicating, and excluding potential flyers or bases because of their size or any other characteristic.
.
When an acroyogi practices earnestly, they foster the following values:
.
- inclusion and community - The belief that anyone can acro and that actively including and welcoming others into the community is important.
- trust, safety, and consent - It is important to foster an environment where flyers and bases can feel safe and supported; a place where they won't be forced to do things they aren't prepared to do.
- egolessness - Check your ego at the door. Acro is about the connections you foster with other human beings, not about how many Instagram followers you have.
- compassionate communication - When working on co-creating together, earnest acroyogi's are patient and compassionate with each other in both failure and success.
.
When it’s not just about getting that next Instagram photo and you instead commit wholeheartedly to these values, it makes a world of difference.

For me, acroyoga is this ridiculously amazing thing that changed my life for the better. That being said, it occurs to me that acroyoga may mean something different to me than it does to others. Acroyoga became something so mind altering that I thought everyone should have the opportunity to experience it. That's why I chose to become a part-time acroyoga teacher, but I realize that not everyone's acroyoga experience is like mine. For some, it's just a physical practice. And that's OK, because you'll still achieve amazing things and cultivate a strong body, but for me, it's the "yoga" part of "acroyoga" that gives it its greatest strength. And I would even go as far as to say that it even levels up your existing yoga practice when you add the "acro” part to it.
.
The “yoga” part of acroyoga instills certain values in the practitioner when it's practiced earnestly. When the values are not part of the practice, you can potentially see things like: jealousy between bases or flyers, ego fueled coercion to keep trying skills that endanger those involved, muscling flyers into poses without full consent or awareness, blaming each other instead of listening and communicating, and excluding potential flyers or bases because of their size or any other characteristic.
.
When an acroyogi practices earnestly, they foster the following values:
.
- inclusion and community - The belief that anyone can acro and that actively including and welcoming others into the community is important.
- trust, safety, and consent - It is important to foster an environment where flyers and bases can feel safe and supported; a place where they won't be forced to do things they aren't prepared to do.
- egolessness - Check your ego at the door. Acro is about the connections you foster with other human beings, not about how many Instagram followers you have.
- compassionate communication - When working on co-creating together, earnest acroyogi's are patient and compassionate with each other in both failure and success.
.
When it’s not just about getting that next Instagram photo and you instead commit wholeheartedly to these values, it makes a world of difference.

138 7 8 March, 2019

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"Yes, softening into joy is uncomfortable. Yes, it's scary. Yes, it's vulnerable. But every time we allow ourselves to lean into joy and give in to those moments, we build resilience and we cultivate hope."
--@brenebrown
.
This is another one of my favorite concepts from Brene Brown -- leaning into joy instead of having foreboding joy. Foreboding joy refers to how we tend to lean away from joy because we struggle with our own worthiness to experience joy. We keep waiting for the other shoe to drop, thinking that our present happiness is just the precursor to something bad.
.
Growing up, my goal was to walk the middle path, avoiding the extremes. I learned to shut off in order to escape pits of anxiety, but I realize now that I also shut myself off from really immersing myself into joy. When was the last time you could say that you felt truly giddy? If you can't answer, like me, you need to practice leaning into joy. So, this is the list of things I'm going to do:
.
1) Start a gratitude journal - everyday, document 3 things you're grateful for. 
2) Regularly meditate. I highly recommend using the @1giantmind app for this.
3) When feeling joyful, set aside your worries, soften, and surrender. And get giddy! It makes you stronger and more grateful when later something bad does happen.
.
To start off my leaning into joy practice, I am posting this video of me doing some varying width foot to hand drills. It was ridiculously hard for me to get to the point I felt comfortable with this skill. With the help of @maxandlizacro, @belightacrobatics, and @aaronlindacro, I finally feel strong in my foot to hand practice. I am grateful for my strength, my badass, fearless flyer in this video, @megglesshen, and my ability to overcome adversity. When I'm basing foot to hand, I'm truly happy. Feeling the connection between hands and feet, each successful press and transition helps me lean into joy.

"Yes, softening into joy is uncomfortable. Yes, it's scary. Yes, it's vulnerable. But every time we allow ourselves to lean into joy and give in to those moments, we build resilience and we cultivate hope."
--@brenebrown
.
This is another one of my favorite concepts from Brene Brown -- leaning into joy instead of having foreboding joy. Foreboding joy refers to how we tend to lean away from joy because we struggle with our own worthiness to experience joy. We keep waiting for the other shoe to drop, thinking that our present happiness is just the precursor to something bad.
.
Growing up, my goal was to walk the middle path, avoiding the extremes. I learned to shut off in order to escape pits of anxiety, but I realize now that I also shut myself off from really immersing myself into joy. When was the last time you could say that you felt truly giddy? If you can't answer, like me, you need to practice leaning into joy. So, this is the list of things I'm going to do:
.
1) Start a gratitude journal - everyday, document 3 things you're grateful for.
2) Regularly meditate. I highly recommend using the @1giantmind app for this.
3) When feeling joyful, set aside your worries, soften, and surrender. And get giddy! It makes you stronger and more grateful when later something bad does happen.
.
To start off my leaning into joy practice, I am posting this video of me doing some varying width foot to hand drills. It was ridiculously hard for me to get to the point I felt comfortable with this skill. With the help of @maxandlizacro , @belightacrobatics , and @aaronlindacro , I finally feel strong in my foot to hand practice. I am grateful for my strength, my badass, fearless flyer in this video, @megglesshen , and my ability to overcome adversity. When I'm basing foot to hand, I'm truly happy. Feeling the connection between hands and feet, each successful press and transition helps me lean into joy.

110 5 5 March, 2019
"We cultivate love when we allow our most vulnerable and powerful selves to be deeply seen and known, and when we honor the spiritual connection that grows from that offering with trust, respect, kindness and affection. Love is not something we give or get; it is something that we nurture and grow, a connection that can only be cultivated between two people when it exists within each one of them – we can only love others as much as we love ourselves.”
— @brenebrown
.
I absolutely love this quote. There are two parts of it that are truly eye opening to me.
.
1) To cultivate love you should seek to be seen and known instead of seeking to be liked and/or loved. It’s part of human nature to desire to be loved, but often we get so caught up in it that we hide who we are and believe that we have to appear or act a certain way to gain the love of others. It’s a learned behavior that is useful to teach you societal norms when you are young, but as you grow older, this works against you. How do you know if you are loved for being you when you are rarely yourself? In extreme cases, you may not have even been able to discover who you are in the first place, because you’ve spent your life trying to be the person you perceived others could love. Yearn to be deeply seen and known and you’ll find the people who will love you because they know you. .
2) Love is not something that is given or received. It is a connection that you nurture together. This one resonates so much for me, because I’m an acroyogi. Challenging acroyoga poses and transitions are only achievable when you forge and nurture your connection with your partner. You have to foster trust and refine communication to co-create together. At the same time, you are nurturing this same connection with yourself, because you are also working to trust yourself. I find that this practice is also helping me manage my other relationships.
.
It's not easy to strive to be deeply seen and known. I admit that it scares me, but I believe the effort is worthwhile no matter how much discomfort the feeling of vulnerability brings.
.
Flyer: @thenextsamus
At @blackswanyogadallas in front of a gorgeous mural by @dereknemo

"We cultivate love when we allow our most vulnerable and powerful selves to be deeply seen and known, and when we honor the spiritual connection that grows from that offering with trust, respect, kindness and affection. Love is not something we give or get; it is something that we nurture and grow, a connection that can only be cultivated between two people when it exists within each one of them – we can only love others as much as we love ourselves.”
@brenebrown
.
I absolutely love this quote. There are two parts of it that are truly eye opening to me.
.
1) To cultivate love you should seek to be seen and known instead of seeking to be liked and/or loved. It’s part of human nature to desire to be loved, but often we get so caught up in it that we hide who we are and believe that we have to appear or act a certain way to gain the love of others. It’s a learned behavior that is useful to teach you societal norms when you are young, but as you grow older, this works against you. How do you know if you are loved for being you when you are rarely yourself? In extreme cases, you may not have even been able to discover who you are in the first place, because you’ve spent your life trying to be the person you perceived others could love. Yearn to be deeply seen and known and you’ll find the people who will love you because they know you. .
2) Love is not something that is given or received. It is a connection that you nurture together. This one resonates so much for me, because I’m an acroyogi. Challenging acroyoga poses and transitions are only achievable when you forge and nurture your connection with your partner. You have to foster trust and refine communication to co-create together. At the same time, you are nurturing this same connection with yourself, because you are also working to trust yourself. I find that this practice is also helping me manage my other relationships.
.
It's not easy to strive to be deeply seen and known. I admit that it scares me, but I believe the effort is worthwhile no matter how much discomfort the feeling of vulnerability brings.
.
Flyer: @thenextsamus
At @blackswanyogadallas in front of a gorgeous mural by @dereknemo

113 11 20 February, 2019
Shame resilience is the ability to say, “This hurts. This is disappointing, maybe even devastating. But success and recognition and approval are not the values that drive me. My value is courage and I was just courageous. You can move on, shame.
-- @brenebrown
.
I woke up with the realization that I'm scared. I'm scared of so many things because of the chance they can bring of shame. I'm Asian after all. A key part of our culture is rooted in saving face or shame avoidance. I've conquered so many fears in the past few years, but I'm still scared, but I'm strong enough now to admit it. .
I faced my fear of heights when I skydived. I faced my fear of open water when I snorkeled in Hawaii. I even faced both of the aforementioned fears at the same time when I dropped down a 23 foot waterfall while white water river rafting. I faced my fear of public speaking when I went through yoga teacher training. I faced my fear of failure over and over in my career and in my acroyoga practice as I trained each new challenging skill. Even when I failed, I always rose back up stronger.
.
But there are things I'm still afraid of, but these things are simultaneously things that I desire. These are the things I've always made excuses or lashed out against in order to justify avoiding them. I'm still scared, but I won't be running away anymore. Instead, I am working to be shame resilient, treading where I previously feared and using my vulnerability to give me strength.
.
What have you been making excuses to avoid? Will you join with me in owning up to our fear of shame and being courageous instead?

Shame resilience is the ability to say, “This hurts. This is disappointing, maybe even devastating. But success and recognition and approval are not the values that drive me. My value is courage and I was just courageous. You can move on, shame.
-- @brenebrown
.
I woke up with the realization that I'm scared. I'm scared of so many things because of the chance they can bring of shame. I'm Asian after all. A key part of our culture is rooted in saving face or shame avoidance. I've conquered so many fears in the past few years, but I'm still scared, but I'm strong enough now to admit it. .
I faced my fear of heights when I skydived. I faced my fear of open water when I snorkeled in Hawaii. I even faced both of the aforementioned fears at the same time when I dropped down a 23 foot waterfall while white water river rafting. I faced my fear of public speaking when I went through yoga teacher training. I faced my fear of failure over and over in my career and in my acroyoga practice as I trained each new challenging skill. Even when I failed, I always rose back up stronger.
.
But there are things I'm still afraid of, but these things are simultaneously things that I desire. These are the things I've always made excuses or lashed out against in order to justify avoiding them. I'm still scared, but I won't be running away anymore. Instead, I am working to be shame resilient, treading where I previously feared and using my vulnerability to give me strength.
.
What have you been making excuses to avoid? Will you join with me in owning up to our fear of shame and being courageous instead?

114 5 15 February, 2019

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"The only thing wrong with trying to please everyone is that there’s always at least one person who will remain unhappy. You."
– Elizabeth Parker
.
As a former habitual people pleaser, one of the most difficult things for me was to accept that the actions I had used for years to be what I perceived as good and likable were bringing me more grief than joy. There's nothing wrong with doing things to bring happiness to others, but it has to come from somewhere authentic. When you do things purely because it's what others want or even worse, because you're afraid you'll upset others, the actions you take are inauthentic because they come from a place of fear and even resentment. People are not as fragile and sensitive as you fear them to be. They won't hate you because you have to postpone an appointment and if they do, do you really want to be friends with someone that could hate over something so trivial?
.
For me, getting out of the habit of people pleasing has been rooted in learning to do three things that have historically been quite difficult for me: .
1) Respectfully saying no when it's in my best interest. Saying no involves getting rid of the irrational fear of retribution for every time you use the word, "no." 2) Apologizing only when an apology is warranted. When I know it's my bad, I gauge whether I'm blowing the severity of the mistake out of proportions and I volunteer solutions instead of apologies. 
3) Freely and confidently expressing my opinions. People are attracted to people with their own minds. If you adjust all your opinions and preferences to match others, you won't rock the boat, but you may also come off like you're putting on a show in order to belong. .
I realize that people pleasing creates a barrier between you and others. Yes, it keeps you safe from scorn or anger, but it also keeps you from true love and connections. As I make progress with these three things, I feel like I am open enough to invite those connections, but it scares the crap out of me at the same time. True love and connection is not without discomfort, but it also can come with intense joy, a joy people pleasing could never yield.

"The only thing wrong with trying to please everyone is that there’s always at least one person who will remain unhappy. You."
– Elizabeth Parker
.
As a former habitual people pleaser, one of the most difficult things for me was to accept that the actions I had used for years to be what I perceived as good and likable were bringing me more grief than joy. There's nothing wrong with doing things to bring happiness to others, but it has to come from somewhere authentic. When you do things purely because it's what others want or even worse, because you're afraid you'll upset others, the actions you take are inauthentic because they come from a place of fear and even resentment. People are not as fragile and sensitive as you fear them to be. They won't hate you because you have to postpone an appointment and if they do, do you really want to be friends with someone that could hate over something so trivial?
.
For me, getting out of the habit of people pleasing has been rooted in learning to do three things that have historically been quite difficult for me: .
1) Respectfully saying no when it's in my best interest. Saying no involves getting rid of the irrational fear of retribution for every time you use the word, "no." 2) Apologizing only when an apology is warranted. When I know it's my bad, I gauge whether I'm blowing the severity of the mistake out of proportions and I volunteer solutions instead of apologies.
3) Freely and confidently expressing my opinions. People are attracted to people with their own minds. If you adjust all your opinions and preferences to match others, you won't rock the boat, but you may also come off like you're putting on a show in order to belong. .
I realize that people pleasing creates a barrier between you and others. Yes, it keeps you safe from scorn or anger, but it also keeps you from true love and connections. As I make progress with these three things, I feel like I am open enough to invite those connections, but it scares the crap out of me at the same time. True love and connection is not without discomfort, but it also can come with intense joy, a joy people pleasing could never yield.

113 21 2 February, 2019
"being [too] nice is blocking you from standing up for yourself, being honest with others, creating deeper relationships, or boldly expressing yourself in the world."
― Aziz Gazipura
.
This quote might seem odd at first, but I've been listening to some insightful audible books lately about the cost of being too nice. Books like "No More Mr. Nice Guy" by Robert Glover and "Not Nice" by Aziz Gazipura have really resonated with me lately. They explain how your desire to be nice all the time can create dysfunction in your life. It comes from believing that there's something wrong with being yourself and that you have to be nice to be liked or loved. So, you put less importance on finding out what you desire and even feel ashamed to voice your desires when you do have them. Instead, you pride yourself on being this nice person who always puts others' desires above your own and tries hard to be what others need. You even go as far as to take others' happiness as your responsibility over your own happiness. Ultimately, you're destined to fall, because you place your happiness in the hands of external sources and you never get to really know and love yourself. It was painful to admit it, but that was who I was and part of that guy still remains even now.
.
It's been reassuring that a good amount of the advice that these books have offered involve things I've already put into action on my own, especially right after completing yoga teacher training. Thanks to @jenny.yogamovement, @danieltodd.yoga, and @katdoesyoga for setting me on that path. I’ve been learning to love myself and have been working on building my voice not only for teaching, but for speaking up when necessary even when it might hurt. My goal is not to be mean, but to be "not nice". It involves being honest and authentic even when I know I’ll face a negative response. And this path continues to scare me as much as excite me. .
If the first paragraph describes you as much as it did me, I encourage you to check out the two books I mentioned and also start a meditation and yoga practice. The change will hurt at first, but it only gets better from there.
.
Body Paint: @tribalifeart
📸: @whoisbossk

"being [too] nice is blocking you from standing up for yourself, being honest with others, creating deeper relationships, or boldly expressing yourself in the world."
― Aziz Gazipura
.
This quote might seem odd at first, but I've been listening to some insightful audible books lately about the cost of being too nice. Books like "No More Mr. Nice Guy" by Robert Glover and "Not Nice" by Aziz Gazipura have really resonated with me lately. They explain how your desire to be nice all the time can create dysfunction in your life. It comes from believing that there's something wrong with being yourself and that you have to be nice to be liked or loved. So, you put less importance on finding out what you desire and even feel ashamed to voice your desires when you do have them. Instead, you pride yourself on being this nice person who always puts others' desires above your own and tries hard to be what others need. You even go as far as to take others' happiness as your responsibility over your own happiness. Ultimately, you're destined to fall, because you place your happiness in the hands of external sources and you never get to really know and love yourself. It was painful to admit it, but that was who I was and part of that guy still remains even now.
.
It's been reassuring that a good amount of the advice that these books have offered involve things I've already put into action on my own, especially right after completing yoga teacher training. Thanks to @jenny.yogamovement , @danieltodd.yoga , and @katdoesyoga for setting me on that path. I’ve been learning to love myself and have been working on building my voice not only for teaching, but for speaking up when necessary even when it might hurt. My goal is not to be mean, but to be "not nice". It involves being honest and authentic even when I know I’ll face a negative response. And this path continues to scare me as much as excite me. .
If the first paragraph describes you as much as it did me, I encourage you to check out the two books I mentioned and also start a meditation and yoga practice. The change will hurt at first, but it only gets better from there.
.
Body Paint: @tribalifeart
📸: @whoisbossk

150 26 12 hours ago
“Say yes and you'll figure it out afterwards.” ― Tina Fey
.
Most of my life has involved me moving forward only when I felt I was adequately prepared. I chose the safe path and moved slowly. I've been successful, but I haven't been really bold. There have been so many things I desired to do, but I just never did them because I was too scared to start them. I missed opportunities, but I accept that back then, I didn't have the right mindset yet. The past 3 years of my life have been about become bolder and that journey started with learning to love myself. I do love myself now, but I'm still shying away from things. So, when @k.vick asked me with only a day's notice to be her base for a body painting acro photoshoot, I said yes. Despite not knowing the artist or what we were going to do at the shoot, I agreed to it anyways. The perfectionist in me would have wanted to prepare. He certainly would have criticized me as we fell out of things trying to calibrate since we hadn't played together in months. But I chose to silence him and it allowed me to have a blast playing while in body paint. As I laid on the mats in a puddle of paint and sweat, it hit me that this is how much fun saying yes and figuring it out afterwards is. And I realized I wanted more.
.
What have you been too afraid to start doing? What's the worst that could happen if you started them and failed? I'm not saying it would be easy, but what if the next time you were afraid to start, you started anyways? What if you set aside your fear, opened your heart, and surrendered to the universe? Being bold is about saying yes and moving forward without having all the answers yet. Will you seek boldness with me?
.
Photo: @whoisbossk
Body painting by: @tribalifeart

“Say yes and you'll figure it out afterwards.” ― Tina Fey
.
Most of my life has involved me moving forward only when I felt I was adequately prepared. I chose the safe path and moved slowly. I've been successful, but I haven't been really bold. There have been so many things I desired to do, but I just never did them because I was too scared to start them. I missed opportunities, but I accept that back then, I didn't have the right mindset yet. The past 3 years of my life have been about become bolder and that journey started with learning to love myself. I do love myself now, but I'm still shying away from things. So, when @k.vick asked me with only a day's notice to be her base for a body painting acro photoshoot, I said yes. Despite not knowing the artist or what we were going to do at the shoot, I agreed to it anyways. The perfectionist in me would have wanted to prepare. He certainly would have criticized me as we fell out of things trying to calibrate since we hadn't played together in months. But I chose to silence him and it allowed me to have a blast playing while in body paint. As I laid on the mats in a puddle of paint and sweat, it hit me that this is how much fun saying yes and figuring it out afterwards is. And I realized I wanted more.
.
What have you been too afraid to start doing? What's the worst that could happen if you started them and failed? I'm not saying it would be easy, but what if the next time you were afraid to start, you started anyways? What if you set aside your fear, opened your heart, and surrendered to the universe? Being bold is about saying yes and moving forward without having all the answers yet. Will you seek boldness with me?
.
Photo: @whoisbossk
Body painting by: @tribalifeart

157 13 14 January, 2019
"I'm still scared. And no matter what happens tonight, when I leave, I don't want to be scared anymore."
-- Dre Parker in the new Karate Kid movie
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This year I'm resolving to live more of a life of passion and drive. Why is this my new year's resolution? I have to admit that I've been scared of a lot of things for a very long time and I couldn't admit it until now. I just made excuses as to why I was shying away from opportunities. I do acknowledge that I have conquered a lot of fears especially in these past few years. As cheesy at it sounds though, I still feel like I'm Dre Parker at the end of the new Karate Kid movie. I've accomplished so much and I know I've proven myself to be a formidable human being, but I have to soldier on, because I'm still scared.
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Ayurveda tells us that we are composed of a mix of three doshas which determine our personalities and body constitutions. Doshas are the manifestations of energy from the different elements that make up living beings. Keeping them in balance is the key to living a healthy life. One of the doshas is Kapha, which is one that manifests greatly in me. The Kapha dosha is associated with strength, nurture, support, calm, patience, and stability. My Kapha has kept me healthy and relatively stress free, but it's also kept me sluggish and resistant to change. My greatest fear is that I'll either spend my life too passive, going through the motions, or I'll put myself out there and even after all my hard work of letting go of my attachment of what others think, I'll embarrass myself and fall into oblivion.
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So, here I am with another human being's head literally in my hands, because I was inspired and scared by a cool post by @acroyogininjawitch.  @thenextsamus and I had no idea whether this was going to work. Even with @acro_climber keeping us safe and filming us, it took a lot of mental effort to try this crazy pose and we nailed it. Swipe to see all our attempts.
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If you're scared like me, I hope you'll join me in having a similar resolution. Reconnect with love, trust the universe has your back, and face down those fears, one step at a time.

"I'm still scared. And no matter what happens tonight, when I leave, I don't want to be scared anymore."
-- Dre Parker in the new Karate Kid movie
.
This year I'm resolving to live more of a life of passion and drive. Why is this my new year's resolution? I have to admit that I've been scared of a lot of things for a very long time and I couldn't admit it until now. I just made excuses as to why I was shying away from opportunities. I do acknowledge that I have conquered a lot of fears especially in these past few years. As cheesy at it sounds though, I still feel like I'm Dre Parker at the end of the new Karate Kid movie. I've accomplished so much and I know I've proven myself to be a formidable human being, but I have to soldier on, because I'm still scared.
.
Ayurveda tells us that we are composed of a mix of three doshas which determine our personalities and body constitutions. Doshas are the manifestations of energy from the different elements that make up living beings. Keeping them in balance is the key to living a healthy life. One of the doshas is Kapha, which is one that manifests greatly in me. The Kapha dosha is associated with strength, nurture, support, calm, patience, and stability. My Kapha has kept me healthy and relatively stress free, but it's also kept me sluggish and resistant to change. My greatest fear is that I'll either spend my life too passive, going through the motions, or I'll put myself out there and even after all my hard work of letting go of my attachment of what others think, I'll embarrass myself and fall into oblivion.
.
So, here I am with another human being's head literally in my hands, because I was inspired and scared by a cool post by @acroyogininjawitch . @thenextsamus and I had no idea whether this was going to work. Even with @acro_climber keeping us safe and filming us, it took a lot of mental effort to try this crazy pose and we nailed it. Swipe to see all our attempts.
.
If you're scared like me, I hope you'll join me in having a similar resolution. Reconnect with love, trust the universe has your back, and face down those fears, one step at a time.

131 5 8 January, 2019
"The root cause of all judgment is the fear of not being good enough, not being worthy of love, and not being safe."
― Gabrielle Bernstein
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The quote above comes from the latest audible book that I've been listening to: #JudgementDetox by @gabbybernstein. Big thanks to @truenorthsurfyoga for the book recommendation. It's been really enlightening to take the time to see how often I judge others and myself. I've developed a habit of taking each judgement I make about others and finding what within myself is triggering the emotional response. It's crazy to see how much your judgement of another person has less to do with the person you're judging and more to do with something within yourself that you don't like. For example, I've judged others who seem to be too busy all the time harshly, because I was struggling with motivating myself to get more done as my personality leans towards taking my time more and taking fewer risks. By criticizing them as people who don't understand the stress they keep introducing into their lives, what I was really doing was feeling jealous of their successes and being angry at myself for being too scared or lazy to get more done. Even as I say that, I'm reminded of Gabby's words though: "the way out of judgement begins when you witness the judgement without more judgement." So, even as I identify the emotional triggers, I know I have to take an attitude of love to ensure I proceed on the right path.
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In this video, I'm basing one my favorite flyers, @yogi_mhc. He is a remarkable human being -- an amazing acroyogi, badass yoga teacher, phenomenal hand balancer, a wise physical therapist, and an energetic lover of life. He also happens to be a Filipino and gay. As Asian Americans, we find ourselves being judged by two different cultures simultaneously, which is why I am always amazed by those who can be unapologetically themselves. To do so, you have to make the choice to set aside judgement by you and others and connect with love instead. Michael is one of those people and I will always love being his friend because of that.
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So, the next time you judge or witness others judging, connect with love to begin the process of healing.

"The root cause of all judgment is the fear of not being good enough, not being worthy of love, and not being safe."
― Gabrielle Bernstein
.
The quote above comes from the latest audible book that I've been listening to: #JudgementDetox by @gabbybernstein . Big thanks to @truenorthsurfyoga for the book recommendation. It's been really enlightening to take the time to see how often I judge others and myself. I've developed a habit of taking each judgement I make about others and finding what within myself is triggering the emotional response. It's crazy to see how much your judgement of another person has less to do with the person you're judging and more to do with something within yourself that you don't like. For example, I've judged others who seem to be too busy all the time harshly, because I was struggling with motivating myself to get more done as my personality leans towards taking my time more and taking fewer risks. By criticizing them as people who don't understand the stress they keep introducing into their lives, what I was really doing was feeling jealous of their successes and being angry at myself for being too scared or lazy to get more done. Even as I say that, I'm reminded of Gabby's words though: "the way out of judgement begins when you witness the judgement without more judgement." So, even as I identify the emotional triggers, I know I have to take an attitude of love to ensure I proceed on the right path.
.
In this video, I'm basing one my favorite flyers, @yogi_mhc . He is a remarkable human being -- an amazing acroyogi, badass yoga teacher, phenomenal hand balancer, a wise physical therapist, and an energetic lover of life. He also happens to be a Filipino and gay. As Asian Americans, we find ourselves being judged by two different cultures simultaneously, which is why I am always amazed by those who can be unapologetically themselves. To do so, you have to make the choice to set aside judgement by you and others and connect with love instead. Michael is one of those people and I will always love being his friend because of that.
.
So, the next time you judge or witness others judging, connect with love to begin the process of healing.

121 12 31 December, 2018
"Don’t ask what the world needs. Ask what makes you come alive, and go do it. Because what the world needs is people who have come alive.” —Howard Thurman
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After almost two weeks of motivational audible book fueled fervor, I was able to begin to be more specific in defining my desires and plans for the future, stick to a daily strength conditioning and flexibility routine, keep up a regular meditation practice, and began the purge of things I don't need around the house and in my life. It's been great, but I'm exhausted now. Being that amped about making changes takes a lot of you. So, now it's time for a bit of self care to balance things out. .
@brendonburchard defines work-life balance as less of a quantitative practice measuring the work-life ratio and more of a qualitative practice weighing your happiness with progress. If you're working so hard to achieve your desired level of success, but you're not happy and able to enjoy yourself, you're out of balance. If you're always goofing off doing things that just give you momentary happiness, then you may have to buckle down and focus on your work. In either case, you also should stop believing the stories you tell yourself that keep you from achieving balance. .
Being naturally more even keeled, I'm often in danger of falling into stagnation and with it, depression. To make myself less inclined to fall into that trap, I've been seeking things to feel strongly about. I want to love fiercely. I want to be less in my head and more visceral when I experience things. So far, the one thing that places me there better than anything is acroyoga. I want to see if I can occasionally shed this super chill persona and become more alive. I’m hoping that it’ll at least be an adventure.

"Don’t ask what the world needs. Ask what makes you come alive, and go do it. Because what the world needs is people who have come alive.” —Howard Thurman
.
After almost two weeks of motivational audible book fueled fervor, I was able to begin to be more specific in defining my desires and plans for the future, stick to a daily strength conditioning and flexibility routine, keep up a regular meditation practice, and began the purge of things I don't need around the house and in my life. It's been great, but I'm exhausted now. Being that amped about making changes takes a lot of you. So, now it's time for a bit of self care to balance things out. .
@brendonburchard defines work-life balance as less of a quantitative practice measuring the work-life ratio and more of a qualitative practice weighing your happiness with progress. If you're working so hard to achieve your desired level of success, but you're not happy and able to enjoy yourself, you're out of balance. If you're always goofing off doing things that just give you momentary happiness, then you may have to buckle down and focus on your work. In either case, you also should stop believing the stories you tell yourself that keep you from achieving balance. .
Being naturally more even keeled, I'm often in danger of falling into stagnation and with it, depression. To make myself less inclined to fall into that trap, I've been seeking things to feel strongly about. I want to love fiercely. I want to be less in my head and more visceral when I experience things. So far, the one thing that places me there better than anything is acroyoga. I want to see if I can occasionally shed this super chill persona and become more alive. I’m hoping that it’ll at least be an adventure.

122 1 21 December, 2018