#imaging Instagram Photos & Videos

imaging - 117k posts

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    ⭐️Happy #Friday Everyone! Today I’m talking about what an cardiac structural imager does. After doing internal medicine residency & cardiology fellowship, there is a specialization for advanced cardiac imaging. During this year you learn more echocardiography, cardiac CT, cardiac MRI, and structural transesophageal echocardiography (TEE).⁣⁣⁣
⁣⁣⁣
💫A TEE is a long ultrasound probe that goes into the mouth ➡️ esophagus and images from the back of the ❤️. It can give better images of certain structures that are now in proximity. It is used to look at valves, the left atrial appendage (LAA), left and right heart function, the pulmonary veins, and more. A TEE is typically not great for imaging the apex of the heart because it is the farthest from the probe.⁣⁣⁣
⁣⁣⁣
🌕I was passionate about TEE when I decided to do an advanced fellowship at Stanford. What does interventional imaging or interventional TEE mean? Well, there is a class of cardiac intervention called #structuralheart These include (but not limited to!) transcatheter aortic valve replacement or transcather aortic valve implantation - #TAVR #TAVI, #MitraClip, #watchmandevice and other cather-based valve replacements and plugs. I image the respective structure with ultrasound and help the interventional cardiologist get the procedure done. Some cases are TEE heavy (like mitraclip), and some very little (TAVR).⁣⁣⁣
⁣⁣⁣
🌟In reality, this means standing in long cases (1-4 hours usually), wearing lead to shield from radiation from fluoroscopy and attentive detail throughout the case. Thinking in 3D and good visual/spatial perception is a bonus, but is something you can develop and learn.⁣⁣⁣ ⁣⁣⁣
🌈Pictured above are some tavr/tavi valves, 3D-printed models for procedure planning, and some watchman devices in different sizes.⁣⁣⁣ ⁣⁣⁣
❓Have you heard of these procedures or this job?⁣⁣⁣
⁣⁣⁣
#cardiology #cardiologist #cardiologyfellows #cardiacimaging #interventionalcardiologist #interventionalTEE #TEE #Echo #echocardiography #internal medicine #medicine #medicalschool #medicalstudents

    ⭐️Happy #Friday Everyone! Today I’m talking about what an cardiac structural imager does. After doing internal medicine residency & cardiology fellowship, there is a specialization for advanced cardiac imaging. During this year you learn more echocardiography, cardiac CT, cardiac MRI, and structural transesophageal echocardiography (TEE).⁣⁣⁣
    ⁣⁣⁣
    💫A TEE is a long ultrasound probe that goes into the mouth ➡️ esophagus and images from the back of the ❤️. It can give better images of certain structures that are now in proximity. It is used to look at valves, the left atrial appendage (LAA), left and right heart function, the pulmonary veins, and more. A TEE is typically not great for imaging the apex of the heart because it is the farthest from the probe.⁣⁣⁣
    ⁣⁣⁣
    🌕I was passionate about TEE when I decided to do an advanced fellowship at Stanford. What does interventional imaging or interventional TEE mean? Well, there is a class of cardiac intervention called #structuralheart These include (but not limited to!) transcatheter aortic valve replacement or transcather aortic valve implantation - #TAVR #TAVI , #MitraClip , #watchmandevice and other cather-based valve replacements and plugs. I image the respective structure with ultrasound and help the interventional cardiologist get the procedure done. Some cases are TEE heavy (like mitraclip), and some very little (TAVR).⁣⁣⁣
    ⁣⁣⁣
    🌟In reality, this means standing in long cases (1-4 hours usually), wearing lead to shield from radiation from fluoroscopy and attentive detail throughout the case. Thinking in 3D and good visual/spatial perception is a bonus, but is something you can develop and learn.⁣⁣⁣ ⁣⁣⁣
    🌈Pictured above are some tavr/tavi valves, 3D-printed models for procedure planning, and some watchman devices in different sizes.⁣⁣⁣ ⁣⁣⁣
    ❓Have you heard of these procedures or this job?⁣⁣⁣
    ⁣⁣⁣
    #cardiology #cardiologist #cardiologyfellows #cardiacimaging #interventionalcardiologist #interventionalTEE #TEE #Echo #echocardiography #internal medicine #medicine #medicalschool #medicalstudents

    10 2 2 hours ago

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    Freshly cleaned floors on this very, VERY hot Friday. 🔥

    Freshly cleaned floors on this very, VERY hot Friday. 🔥

    5 1 5 hours ago

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    Radiology - "Topsy-Turvy Heart: Volume-rendered CT Angiography"

Published: May 14, 2019

Movie E1: AVi of the axial images showing upside down heart and abnormal ventriculo-arterial relations, and aorto-pulmonary window.

    Radiology - "Topsy-Turvy Heart: Volume-rendered CT Angiography"

    Published: May 14, 2019

    Movie E1: AVi of the axial images showing upside down heart and abnormal ventriculo-arterial relations, and aorto-pulmonary window.

    31 1 7 hours ago
    Happy Friday! In this video, we learn a could of key things as to why some speakers can disappear and others cant! #transparency #soundtstage #imaging https://youtu.be/Od0aDWcYlmM

    Happy Friday! In this video, we learn a could of key things as to why some speakers can disappear and others cant! #transparency #soundtstage #imaging https://youtu.be/Od0aDWcYlmM

    6 1 9 hours ago

Top #imaging posts

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    Scans at the appropriate time can be so helpful in clinical management of certain injuries. Great post by @shoulderdoctor - WHICH SCAN AND WHY?
.
I have had a few patients recently who were perturbed that they hadn’t been sent for an MRI, assuming this is the “gold standard” scan regardless of clinical diagnosis. While I often do send for MRI scans it’s not necessarily always the best or most appropriate scan.
.
Fractures, for example are better demonstrated on x-ray or CT scan but these don’t necessarily show soft tissue pathology.
.
Ultrasound is cheap, quick and often more accessible. While it can’t show features of capsulitis or joint pathology (labral tears, intra-articular portion of LHB and joint surface injuries), in the right hands it’s just as good as an MRI for rotator cuff pathology and especially tears.
.
In my practice we run a one-stop ultrasound scan clinic where the patient, surgeon and radiologist are all present. Just like a pregnancy ultrasound scan the radiologist shows the patient the different parts of their shoulder and discusses the diagnosis at the same sitting. Because it’s a “live” scan patients are able to ask questions and discuss any areas they are unsure of in more detail. We can then discuss options for treatment there and then and the patient leaves with a full diagnosis and treatment plan.
.
The world of diagnostics is always changing and we do our best to make sure that patients are always sent for the right type of scan, even if this means that they might need a combination of two or more scans.

    Scans at the appropriate time can be so helpful in clinical management of certain injuries. Great post by @shoulderdoctor - WHICH SCAN AND WHY?
    .
    I have had a few patients recently who were perturbed that they hadn’t been sent for an MRI, assuming this is the “gold standard” scan regardless of clinical diagnosis. While I often do send for MRI scans it’s not necessarily always the best or most appropriate scan.
    .
    Fractures, for example are better demonstrated on x-ray or CT scan but these don’t necessarily show soft tissue pathology.
    .
    Ultrasound is cheap, quick and often more accessible. While it can’t show features of capsulitis or joint pathology (labral tears, intra-articular portion of LHB and joint surface injuries), in the right hands it’s just as good as an MRI for rotator cuff pathology and especially tears.
    .
    In my practice we run a one-stop ultrasound scan clinic where the patient, surgeon and radiologist are all present. Just like a pregnancy ultrasound scan the radiologist shows the patient the different parts of their shoulder and discusses the diagnosis at the same sitting. Because it’s a “live” scan patients are able to ask questions and discuss any areas they are unsure of in more detail. We can then discuss options for treatment there and then and the patient leaves with a full diagnosis and treatment plan.
    .
    The world of diagnostics is always changing and we do our best to make sure that patients are always sent for the right type of scan, even if this means that they might need a combination of two or more scans.

    1,232 15 18 July, 2019

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