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    It’s always been my ambition to grow as many plants from ancient Egypt in my Aussie garden as possible - here’s our first crop of pomegranates - the birds and wallabies had a go at them but that good hard skin kept them pretty safe. I have lots of recipes for them and we frequently have them in meals but home grown always tastes best!
#gardening #homegrown #sustainable #ancientegypt

    It’s always been my ambition to grow as many plants from ancient Egypt in my Aussie garden as possible - here’s our first crop of pomegranates - the birds and wallabies had a go at them but that good hard skin kept them pretty safe. I have lots of recipes for them and we frequently have them in meals but home grown always tastes best!
    #gardening #homegrown #sustainable #ancientegypt

    8 0 14 minutes ago

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    #Repost 
Did ancient Egyptian children compete to see who could spit seeds the furthest as they ate watermelons? It seems likely, because thanks to some DNA detective work we now know for sure that the ancient Egyptians ate domesticated watermelons with sweet, red flesh.

The wild watermelons found in parts of Africa are nothing like the domesticated varieties. They are small, round and have white flesh with a very bitter taste due to compounds called cucurbitacins. There’s long been debate about when and where they were domesticated, with some suggesting it took place in south Africa or west Africa.

However, pictures on the walls of at least three ancient Egyptian tombs depict what look like watermelons – including one that looks strikingly like modern varieties (pictured below). And in the 19th century, watermelon leaves were found placed on a mummy in a tomb dating back around 3500 years.

When botanist Susanne Renner at the University of Munich, Germany, learned about these leaves, she realised their DNA might reveal what the ancient melons were like. She also discovered that some of the leaves had been sent to the famed botanist Joseph Hooker, then head of Kew Gardens in London. “It was my love of the old literature,” she says.

Mark Nesbitt at Kew gave Renner’s team a tiny sample of one leaf. He had trouble opening the display case containing the leaves, she says, as it had not been opened since the leaves were first placed in it in 1876.

The ancient DNA was then sequenced by Renner’s colleague Guillaume Chomicki, now at the University of Oxford. The team were only able to get a partial genome sequence, but it includes two crucial genes that reveal what these melons were like. “We were so lucky,” says Renner.

One of these genes controls the production of the bitter cucurbitacins. In the 3500-year-old melon, there was a mutation that disabled this gene, meaning it had sweet flesh just like modern varieties.
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.🎓@mister_imhotep
.💫Rebranding Africa💫
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#blackconsciousness #blackexcellence #Ancientegypt #blacklivesmatter #quote #beautiful #god #nature #blackwomen #kinkyhair #africa #Melaninonfleek #naturalhaircommunity #black

    #Repost
    Did ancient Egyptian children compete to see who could spit seeds the furthest as they ate watermelons? It seems likely, because thanks to some DNA detective work we now know for sure that the ancient Egyptians ate domesticated watermelons with sweet, red flesh.

    The wild watermelons found in parts of Africa are nothing like the domesticated varieties. They are small, round and have white flesh with a very bitter taste due to compounds called cucurbitacins. There’s long been debate about when and where they were domesticated, with some suggesting it took place in south Africa or west Africa.

    However, pictures on the walls of at least three ancient Egyptian tombs depict what look like watermelons – including one that looks strikingly like modern varieties (pictured below). And in the 19th century, watermelon leaves were found placed on a mummy in a tomb dating back around 3500 years.

    When botanist Susanne Renner at the University of Munich, Germany, learned about these leaves, she realised their DNA might reveal what the ancient melons were like. She also discovered that some of the leaves had been sent to the famed botanist Joseph Hooker, then head of Kew Gardens in London. “It was my love of the old literature,” she says.

    Mark Nesbitt at Kew gave Renner’s team a tiny sample of one leaf. He had trouble opening the display case containing the leaves, she says, as it had not been opened since the leaves were first placed in it in 1876.

    The ancient DNA was then sequenced by Renner’s colleague Guillaume Chomicki, now at the University of Oxford. The team were only able to get a partial genome sequence, but it includes two crucial genes that reveal what these melons were like. “We were so lucky,” says Renner.

    One of these genes controls the production of the bitter cucurbitacins. In the 3500-year-old melon, there was a mutation that disabled this gene, meaning it had sweet flesh just like modern varieties.
    .
    .
    .
    .
    .
    .🎓@mister_imhotep
    .💫Rebranding Africa💫
    .
    .
    #blackconsciousness #blackexcellence #Ancientegypt #blacklivesmatter #quote #beautiful #god #nature #blackwomen #kinkyhair #africa #Melaninonfleek #naturalhaircommunity #black

    5 0 35 minutes ago

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    Кулон с богиней-львицей Сахмет
350 руб.

    Кулон с богиней-львицей Сахмет
    350 руб.

    6 8 1 hour ago

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    A Brilliant creation from artist Joekim Ericsson.
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Tag your photos with #theprimordialcyberpunk For a chance to be featured.

    A Brilliant creation from artist Joekim Ericsson.


    Tag your photos with #theprimordialcyberpunk For a chance to be featured.

    4,327 10 16 hours ago

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